AI-12 (June, 2021) — Cooperation between Taiwan and India: External Environment, Issues and Format

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Cooperation between Taiwan and India: External Environment, Issues and Format

Arthur S. Ding (Emeritus Professor, Graduate Institute of East Asian Studies, National Chengchi University, Taiwan)

Taiwan and India started to contact each other in mid-1990s, and it had experienced a period of try and error over what could be done by the both sides. At that time, India launched a Look East policy with a goal to engage East and Southeast Asia, while Taiwan experienced a growing trend moving west to China by Taiwanese businessmen. Stability could be maintained along the India-China border.

Nevertheless, thing has changed rapidly in the past decade, and this change is really beyond our imagination. Key factor is Xi Jinping’s ascendency to become China’s top leader, he launched ambitious and aggressive foreign policy in the name of the great rejuvenation of Chinese nationals. His policy, such as ADIZ in East China Sea, BRI, and associated AIIB, and new type of IR between major powers, has been regarded as something to challenge the established power of the……(for fulltext, please download AI-12)

Dr. Arthur S. Ding is an Emeritus Professor, Graduate Institute of East Asian Studies, National Chengchi University, Taiwan. He can be reached via: ding1@nccu.edu.tw

AI-11 (March, 2019) — India-China Naval Competition in the Indian Ocean

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India-China Naval Competition in the Indian Ocean

Abhijit Singh (Head, Maritime Policy Initiative,ORF/Observer Research Foundation, India)

When India’s navy chief, Admiral Sunil Lanba, addressed a press conference in New Delhi on the occasion of Navy Day earlier this month, the spotlight was squarely on emerging naval dynamics in the Indian Ocean. A majority of queries by journalists presented at the interaction concerned India’s moves to combat China’s growing presence in littoral-South Asia.

Admiral Lanba observed that while Chinese naval activity in the Indian Ocean has indeed expanded significantly, the balance-of-regional power remains very much in India’s favour. With a planned upgrade in inventory, including 56 new ships and submarines, the Indian navy, he observed is demonstrating new resolve to be a net security provider in the Indian Ocean region, committed to combating the spectrum of traditional and non-traditional threats. While PLAN has plans to become a superpower by 2050, he noted, the Indian navy is intent on being a “world-class navy with 200….(for fulltext, please download AI-11)

Dr. Abhijit Singh is a Senior Fellow of Observer Research Foundation, India. He can be reached via: abhijitsingh@orfonline.org

AI-10 (February, 2019) — Implication of 2019 Elections on Indian Foreign Policy

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Implication of 2019 Elections on Indian Foreign Policy

Rajdeep Pakanati (Associate Professor, O.P. Jindal Global University, Sonipat, India)

Indian Foreign Policy making and execution, is driven by greater continuityand greater change and the coming elections in 2019 will not have a dramatic impact on the conduct of IFP. To understand the conduct of IFP we need to look at the drivers of IFP and also how it is executed. The conduct of IFP is driven by a significant normative agenda coupled with a pragmatist perspective centered around India’s conflicts with Pakistan, China, and the United States. The normative agenda is seen is clearly seen in the post-Independence context when the non-violent struggle against colonialism greatly influenced India’s stance to propose and pursue the non-aligned movement (NAM). The other area where the normative stance is visible is the pursuit of nuclear weapons and then declaring a ‘no-first use’ doctrine. The pragmatist practices are clearly evident in the pursuit of its national interests when it comes its dealings with Pakistan, China and the United States, which capture the most interest in IFP – policy and practice. The paper will lay out how IFP will show the above-mentioned continuityand greater change in IFP can be discerned by looking closely at the three major relationships of India, vis-à-vis Pakistan, China and the….(for fulltext, please download AI-11)

Dr. Rajdeep Pakanati is an Associate Professor of O.P. Jindal Global University, Sonipat, India. He can be reached via: rpakanati@jgu.edu.in

AI-09 (January, 2019) — Migration Network Connecting South-Southeast Asia: An Evolving Non-traditional Security Threat in Indo-Pacific Region

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Migration Network Connecting South-Southeast Asia: An Evolving Non-traditional Security Threat in Indo-Pacific Region

Debasis Dash (University of Malaya, Malaysia)

Migration is a global phenomenon with over hundreds of millions of people moving across the physical borders, making the cartographic lines demarcating political borders look less relevant and blurred. This trans-border and transnational movement of people have several reasons to it. The phenomenon refers to both voluntary and involuntary movement of people affected by and because of political, social, economic, security and personal reasons. However, irrespective of the type of migration as it happens, there are legitimate security concerns and challenges posed both to the sending and receiving nation-state. While the concerns over the violation of human rights and human dignity remains the core issue, the migration network also provides a fertile ground for both the non-state and state actors to push their devious agenda through the network. Moreover, the flow of migrants irrespective of the ground realities, also creates a favorable condition for human trafficking, slavery, smuggling and development of transnational organized crime networks and growth….(for fulltext, please download AI-09)

AI-08 (January, 2019) — A marriage of mutual interests in Myanmar-China Relations

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A marriage of mutual interests in Myanmar-China Relations

Nehginpao Kipgen (Professor and Executive Director, Center for Southeast Asian Studies, O.P. Jindal Global University)

Historically, Myanmar-China relations are based on five principles of peaceful coexistence, known as Panchsheel: mutual respect for each other’s territorial integrity and sovereignty, mutual non-aggression, mutual non-interference in each other’s internal affairs, equality and cooperation for mutual benefit, and peaceful co-existence.

The bilateral relations are also largely shaped by a shared border of about 2,204 kilometers. Moreover, about 3% of Myanmar’s estimated over 54 million people are Chinese.

The relations between the two nations have largely been cordial and peaceful. In the past couple of years (2017-18), the bilateral relations have been further strengthened by two major issues – the China-Myanmar Economic Corridor (CMEC) and the….(for fulltext, please download AI-08)

Dr. Nehginpao Kipgen is a Professor and Executive Director of Center for Southeast Asian Studies, O.P. Jindal Global University, India. He can be reached via: nkipgen@jgu.edu.in

AI-07 (January, 2019) — The Clash of Giants: A Divided APEC of 2018 and Incoming Regional Economic (Dis)order

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The Clash of Giants:

A Divided APEC of 2018 and Incoming Regional Economic (Dis)order

Chia-Chien Chan (Non-Resident Fellow, Center for Southeast Asian Studies, National Chengchi University, Taiwan)

Established in 1989, the Asia-Pacific Economic Cooperation (APEC) used to be considered one of the most important forums for leaders in the Pacific Rim to facilitate trade and investment liberalization. Consisting of 21 economies that account for 47% of global trade and 60% of world GDP,1 the APEC is noted for its non-binding, consensus-based, inclusive and voluntary approach to decision-making. It successfully nurtured political commitment to economic cooperation among such a huge and diverse group of members only until 2018, the year before the APEC’s 30th anniversary. For the first time since its inception, the 21 APEC members were unable to issue a joint communiqué this year. As the host country’s leader and chair of the 2018 APEC summit, Papua New Guinea Prime Minister Peter O’Neill offered his….(for fulltext, please download AI-07)

Dr. Chia-Chien Chang is a Non-Resident Fellow of Center for Southeast Asian Studies, National Chengchi University, Taiwan. He can be reached via: changchiachien@dragon.nchu.edu.tw

AI-06 (Dec. 2018) — India China: Managing Differences and Building Trust, yet again

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India China:
Managing Differences and Building Trust, yet again

Avinash Godbole (Assistant Professor, O.P. Jindal Global University, India)

It is, by now, a well-accepted fact that India China bilateral relations are complex. Not only that, there have been so many downswings in the last decade that a lot of energy has had to be invested in the repair and restore process. Stapled visas and the subsequent standoffs including at Daulat beg Oldi, Chumar, Demchok and the biggest of it all the one in Doklam have threatened to derail the relations. During each incident, meetings and exercise and dialogues and exchange visits were postponed or delayed as tensions built. As a consequence, after each incident, there has been a fresh start. This appears to have entered a loop. The big question is how to manage the cyclical ups and downs better and if it is even possible to get of this pattern.

India China relations also have their own set of lexicons; civilizational connections being one, ancient civilizations with shared history being another. In the post-colonial era….(for fulltext, please download AI-06)

Dr. Avinash Godbole is an Assistant Professor of O.P. Jindal Global University, India. He can be reached via: agodbole@jgu.edu.in

AI-05 (Dec. 2018) — South Korea’s “New Southern Policy”: Economic Diversification with Strategic and Social Dimensions

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South Korea’s “New Southern Policy”: Economic Diversification with Strategic and Social Dimensions

Leif-Eric Easley (Associate Professor, International Studies, Ewha Womans University, Korea)

President Moon Jae-in declared the Republic of Korea (ROK or South Korea)’s “New Southern Policy” (신남방정책) at the Indonesia-Korea Business Forum in Jakarta in November 2017:

“The Korean government will strongly push forward its New Southern Policy to dramatically improve cooperative ties with ASEAN…[achieving] a community for the people that connects people to people and minds to minds; a community of peace that can contribute to peace across Asia; and, lastly, a community of co-existence and co-prosperity where ASEAN countries thrive together with reciprocal economic cooperation.”

The policy’s significance is demonstrated by the attention the Moon administration has shown to strengthening ties with Indo-Pacific neighbors. According to the ROK Ministry of Foreign Affairs, the “New Southern Policy”aims to reinforce relations across economic, strategic and social dimensions. At the 19th Korea-ASEAN Summit, Moon announced that one of South Korea’s core diplomatic policies will be to deepen cooperation with Southeast Asia and India. Even at a joint press conference with U.S. President Donald Trump, Moon emphasized that South Korea aims for a more “balanced diplomacy,” not by downgrading relations with major powers, but by upgrading relations with Indo-Pacific regional partners….(for fulltext, please download AI-05)

Dr. Leif-Eric Easley is Associate Professor of International Studies at Ewha Womans University, Korea. He can be reached via: leifeasley@gmail.com

AI-04 (Dec. 2018) — China-India Plus in Afghanistan and Beyond: How Far Can It Go?

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China-India Plus in Afghanistan and Beyond: How Far Can It Go?

Roger Liu (Chair, the Center for South and Southeast Asia Studies (CSSAS); Associate Professor, Political Science, FLAME University, India)

Saumya Sampath (Research Associate, Centre for Experimental Social Sciences (CESS) Nuffield–FLAME University, India)

The bilateral relationship between China and India begins to warm up after
the Modi-Xi informal meeting in Wuhan, Hubei Province in April 2018. Other
than a series of official meetings, China also launched the “China India Plus
(CI+).” As a pilot project aiming at possible co-management of regional affairs
such as the Afghanistan situation, the Rohingya issue as well as the Iran nuclear
issue, the CI+ reflects the Chinese ambition to extrapolate the model to countries
such as Nepal and Sri Lanka in areas such as infrastructure, economics and even
security. Beginning with a joint training program for Afghan diplomats in New
Delhi and Beijing, China and India are also planning to work on a joint economic
project in Afghanistan….(for fulltext, please download AI-04)

Dr.Roger C.F. Liu is Chair of the Center for South and Southeast Asia Studies (CSSAS)and Associate Professor of Political Science, FLAME University, India. He can be reached via: roger.cf.liu [at] gmail.com
Saumya Sampath is Research Associate at Centre for Experimental Social Sciences (CESS) Nuffield–FLAME University, India. She ca be reached via:
saumya.sampath@flame.edu.in

AI-03 (Nov. 2018) — Quad v/s Act East Policy: A Cautious India Needs to Move Closer to Regional/Sub-regional Initiatives

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Quad v/s Act East Policy: A Cautious India Needs to Move Closer to Regional/Sub-regional Initiatives

By Sampa Kundu (Assistant Professor, Symbiosis School of International Studies, India)

November 2018 witnessed few significant developments with regard to India’s Act East Policy and India’s broader approach to the Indo-Pacific. The Indian Prime Minister Narendra Modi visited Singapore to attend the ASEANIndia Breakfast Summit, 13th East Asia Summit (EAS), 2nd Regional Comprehensive Economic Cooperation (RCEP) Summit and other meetings related to the Association of Southeast Asian Nations (ASEAN). Mr. Modi specifically mentioned about the broader canvass of India’s approach towards Indo-Pacific and India’s Act East Policy (AEP) where ASEAN plays a central role in the Summits and meetings that he attended in Singapore. The AEP and India’s approach to the Indo-Pacific seem to be complimentary to each other as both these policies reiterate about India’s reinvigorated involvement in the geo-strategic affairs of the wider construct of the Indo-Pacific. However, the question remains, whether the four-country Quad forum, which seems to be one of the visible outcomes of the construct of the Indo-Pacific, has been received well by the ASEAN countries….(for fulltext, please download AI-03)

Dr. Sampa Kundu is Assistant Professor, Symbiosis School of International Studies, India. She can be reached via: sampa.sun@gmail.com